Tucson Tech: University of Arizona startup advances living heart patch

Repairing beating human hearts with living patches is the aim of Avery Therapeutics, a startup company founded on technology developed by University of Arizona researchers.

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University of Arizona Startups Draw Silicon Valley Attention to Tucson

The University of Arizona's Tech Launch Arizona invited Avery Therapeutics as one of three showcase technologies to Silicon Valley. The road show took place at TechCode, an accelerator located in Mountain View, CA and provided a unique experience to pitch in front of investors from around the world.

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Avery Therapeutics: Developing a heart graft that pulses on its own

Avery Therapeutics was highlighted in a special “Hotbed of Innovation” section of the Summer 2017 issue of Biz Tucson – a Tucson centric business publication - (pg 82)

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Startup Commercializes Beating Heart Graft Invented at University of Arizona

Avery Therapeutics, Inc., has licensed a beating heart graft technology invented at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson. Pre-clinical studies have already shown that the technology, called MyCardia™, improves heart function.

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Jordan Lancaster, MyCardia™ Co-Inventor, Discusses the use of iPSCs

Award from Cellular Dynamics International to explore the use of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in engineered tissue results in beating heart graft.

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Shout Out for Avery Therapeutics at US House Meeting on Small Business

At ~33 minutes Representative Ron Barber showcases University of Arizona support programs for small businesses including Avery Therapeutics, a local innovative business commercializing a new technology for heart failure.

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University of Arizona Awards Asset Development Funding for MyCardia™ Technology

Joann MacMaster, TLA’s director of business development, “these asset development projects can significantly enhance a technology’s viability and readiness for the market, thereby increasing its attractiveness to investors and entrepreneurs interested in building startups around these UA technologies.

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MyCardia™ Technology a “must-see” on NPR Science Friday

Jordan Lancaster and Steven Goldman, of the Southern Arizona Veterans Administration and the University of Arizona, put rat heart cells on a piece of synthetic mesh and within a few days, the mesh started beating. The hope is that the patch could be used to treat damaged hearts.

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MyCardia™ Showcased by American Heart Association

Arizona researchers have successfully constructed and implanted a three-dimensional (3-D) “scaffold” of living, beating heart muscle cells to repair diseased and failing hearts in laboratory animals.

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